Poutine Week – How to heat up left over poutine

poutine week leftovers

February 4, 2013

in Food, Recipes

So we’re a couple of days into Montreal’s first ever Poutine Week, how is everyone doing? Are you clothes fitting a bit snug, walking a bit slower and glassy-eyed? Has your cognitive decision making been compromised? If you’re like me and pounding down the poutines hard in the name of our national treasure that isn’t Celine Dion, then chances are your fridge is quickly piling up with takeout containers of failed conquests. The best thing about poutine is also the worst thing about poutine… the leftovers; and not only the leftovers, but the age old argument of how to properly heat them up.

poutine week leftovers
Making my way through various spots around the city, I’ve amassed various poutine remnants and after trial and error, I’ve found the optimal way of reheating the poutine depending on what kind it is.

poutine week leftovers
Method 1 – French fry based poutines
Poutine: Poutineville’s Braised beef poutine + Burgerbar Crescent’s “Hangover” poutine.
Ingredients: Braised beef, sautéed mushrooms, truffle oil.


I realized a while ago, when you try to nuke anything dense in the microwave, setting it to 5 minutes isn’t going to do a thing but bring your plate up to a million degrees and leave your fries; like asshole soup or pasta sauce; exploding all over the microwave and remaining cold in the middle. What you need is a moist heat that’s going to permeate your food. Oh yeah, in case you’re wondering, coincidentally, “Moist Heat” was my stripper name. Tactic of choice, the “wet-fry”!

poutine week leftovers
The technique to pan-fry dumplings works just as well in this context. Empty your poutine into a skillet on medium-high heat, and heat it up for about 5 mins. Once your poutine starts talking and repenting for making you feel gross for the past few days and starts crackling and popping, go ahead and drown it with half a cup of water (trust me) and put a lid over the pan.

poutine week leftovers
This will not only reconstitute the wiry potatoes that live inside your lump of leftover poutine, but the steam will actually loosen it up – don’t worry about the cheese, the steam isn’t hot enough to melt it, just enough to soften it. Remove the lid and then let it sit in the pan for a couple of minutes, enough to dry and crisp up the bottom. This technique isn’t going to restore your fries to a post-oil-bath status, but it also isn’t going to make your leftovers suck.

poutine week leftovers
Method 2 – Roasted potato based poutines
Poutine: Fabregé’s Breakfast Poutine.
Ingredients: Roasted potatoes, caramelized onions, and red peppers, bacon, hollandaise sauce, cheese curds and a fried egg.

Even when I was eating this, the first thing that went through my head was… “I think the guy behind me farted…” But the second thing was, “Hey, you know what, this breakfast poutine would make a really great hash.” So I hashed up the leftovers that I brought home.

poutine week leftovers
All it takes is a medium chop of all your ingredients, press them together in an oiled pan, set to medium-heat and give it about 8-10 minutes to heat through and bind. I ended up mixing to shredded mozzarella I had in the fridge to have the gnarly bits hold together. The crust is what makes any kind of hash heavenly.

poutine week leftovers
There you have it, I present to you, “Poutine two-ways”. I mean, obviously there are other ways to heat up poutine, just none that are this awesome.

Were you able to get out and try some of Montreal’s finest poutine creations this week? You have a few days left, so get out there and poutine your faces off!

Bon Apoutine!

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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Mary Manolis February 6, 2013 at 10:02 am

237 NOTRE DAME OUEST (near the OLD PORT has the best old fashioned poutine. People from NYC,VIRGINIA, CALIFORNIA, come for this poutine. Crispy hand cut fries, home made gravy, and creamy cheese curds.

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Dan February 28, 2014 at 2:05 pm

So I thought id try your first technique earlier today because I’m sick and tired of reheating my poutine only to have it have the consistency of soup and I must say I’m extremely disappointed in the results. The cheese melted into nothing almost immediately, and I’m not sure how much poutine you were talking about when you did this but 1/4 of a cup of water turned mine into a disgusting slush that was completely inedible. I think I’m just gonna stick to the microwave from now on.

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Jason February 28, 2014 at 2:16 pm

If your cheese melted into nothing, then it probably isn’t real cheese curds, or is a reduced fat cheese. 1/4 cup of water in a 12 inch hot frying pan sizzles into steam within seconds. Perhaps your pan was too small or heat not high enough. Sorry it didn’t work out for you.

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michael April 23, 2016 at 1:38 pm

you saved my poutine from last night thank you so much

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Chef Hammy February 25, 2018 at 4:15 pm

How long do you leave it covered bub????

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Amanda March 10, 2018 at 1:31 pm

I tried combining a bunch of different strategies I found online and came up with this…
400degrees F
Put veg oil on your baking sheet (not spray)
Spread out your Poutine
(You are going to look some gravy in the cooking process but try to keep the most gravy and cheese on a pile of French fries)
Cover with tin foil and cook for approximately 10 mins (I didn’t actually time it-went by smelling it)
Pull out and remove tin foil
Add extra cheese if you want to!
If so, put it back in for 3-5 mins to melt the added cheese!
Remove and enjoy!
You will probably gets mushy fry every once in a while because that is just how it works with poutine! But I would say 90% of my fries had some extra crunch!

Hope this helps!
-Amanda

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Tamara August 31, 2019 at 12:08 am

Tried method 1. Absolutely brilliant. I was really concerned about having to pour water on my poutine lol but damn, it worked..You obviously have to tweak it a bit depending on how much poutine you’re reheating, size of pan etc. but it’s great as a rough guideline!

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